News Archive

(2205) Week of June 1, 2005

Alexander Named State Cheerleading Coach of the Year
West Pelzer voters to decide among six Council candidates
District One School Board adopts 5 year strategic plan
District One Budget proposes 3 mill increase
Downtown project plan to go before Council Monday
Trench Collapse
Remembering Leslie Mazzara
Teachers receive TIAA-CREF Awards
Greenville Schools earn Red Carpet Status

 

Greenville County Schools and TIAA CREF recently announced the third annual TIAA-CREF Leaders in Learning and Liberty Awards.  The program was established to provide recognition of the vital link between strong public schools and democracy.

There were six categories: Principal of the Year; Administrative Assistant of the Year; District Professional Staff Member of the Year; School Support Staff Member of the Year; Other Support Staff Member of the Year; and Operations Staff Member of the Year.

David Johnstone of Fork Shoals School  was named Principal of the Year. Johnstone is known for “thinking outside the box” and encouraging the staff to take risks. Through his leadership, the school has successfully met AYP and is attracting many new families to the school.

The staff has given him a 100% satisfaction rate in providing effective leadership. He has not only raised the quality of teaching and learning in his school, but has led the school to becoming an authorized International Baccalaureate School. As a result, students are becoming more open-minded, modeling and using the IB principles and attitudes every day.

Also recognized were Administrative Assistant of the Year, Linda Thigpen, Washington Center; Professional Staff Employee of the Year, Jane Kinard, Superintendent’s Executive Assistant and Board Liaison Julie Miller, Special Education Paraprofessional, Duncan Chapel Elementary was named school support staff of the year.

Suzanne Gervais, Processing Center Coordinator and Operations Staff Employee of the Year, Leon Dawkins, Building Superintendents, Simpsonville Elementary.

 

 

 

Alexander Named State Cheerleading Coach of the Year

Palmetto High Varsity/JV Cheerleading coach Sheri Alexander has been named State Coach of the Year.

She has been a cheerleading coach for 16 years and has coached at Palmetto High for four years.

Under her direction, varsity squad accomplishments in 2004 included competing in 8 regional competitions.

 The squad placed 2nd in the first competition, 3rd in the second, and 1st in all 6 others. They placed 3rd at the state qualifying competition and were  runner-up at the State 2A competition.

The Palmetto Competition Squad won the regional competition and was named regional champions.

Five seniors from the squad were named all-region. One senior won a $500 scholarship given by the South Carolina Cheer Coaches Association (SCCCA) for her high GPA and an essay she wrote about being a cheerleader and what it teaches about life.

The JV squad also had a great year in competitions under her direction.

Past personal accomplishments associated with cheerleading for Coach Alexander include being nominated for Coach of the Year in 1997-98 while coaching at Wren High School.

The Wren squad won the 3A State Championship that year.

Wren was also runner-up at the State competition in 1998-99, and 99-00 while Alexander was coaching there.

She is the owner/coach of a small cheer gym, Cheer Academy, which was established in 1991. She started the first JV competitive squad at Palmetto High 2 years ago.

Alexander’s professional accomplishments include being a sales rep for Varsity Spirit Fashions, a cheer and dance supply company based in Memphis, TN.

She was presented the 2004 Sales Performance of the Year award, and was also their Rookie of the Year in 1994-95, her first year with the company.

Coach Alexander will be honored at a banquet on July 29, along with every other SC High school sport’s “Coach of the Year”, at the Palmetto Expo Center in Greenville.

West Pelzer voters to decide among six Council candidates

Six candidates are running for two positions on West Pelzer Town Council which will be decided by voters next Tuesday, June 7.

Running are Joe Turner, Earl Brown, Linda Lozano, Pat Alexander, Randall Ledford and Marshall King.

Alexander and Ledford are political newcomers, and both have strong, but similar, views on the town and its future.

Pat Alexander has lived in West Pelzer for thirty five years, and with her husband Gary, has raised two sons. She says that the confusion and lack of cooperation on the current council is one of the main reasons for her running.

Alexander also sees addressing the water and sewer issues as her number one priority.

Randall Ledford, has been interested in the town council’s actions since he moved from Pelzer to West Pelzer about three and a half years ago. He and his wife have two grown children and have lived in the West Pelzer area for seven years. Ledford said he would like to attract new businesses and get the town upgraded  in its appearance and parking. Water and sewer problems are also concerns for him.

He said a downtown beautification grant that the town council chose not to pursue a few months ago could have helped the town.

Ledford also sees the dissension on council as a problem.

He is a machinist/fabricator but feels his previous work experience in restaurant management trained him to make decisions when they had to be made.

Joe Turner has been on the West Pelzer Town Council for 17 years. He also  has water and sewer on his mind and would like to see more businesses in town.

He adds that there are properties in town that could be sold or leased to new businesses, and added that the town’s efforts at annexation offer some hope for expansion.

Turner, who has at times been critical of the current mayor, says that cooperation is still his goal.

Earl Brown, incumbent councilman for the Town of West Pelzer, favors improved management of the town’s business, as well as increased cooperation among the Council members.

Brown, a resident of the Pelzer/West Pelzer area for all of his 79 years, has been on the Council for four years.

He said he would like to see more businesses in town, possibly a dry goods store or maybe another restaurant.

Water and sewer service are also central to the town’s continued growth, he said. He said the town has  a grant for water lines, and that council needs to try to upgrade the town.

Brown also sees increased cooperation as being very important.

Linda Lozano is no stranger to West Pelzer, or the challenges the town faces.

She has lived in the town or the surrounding area for most of her life. She served on the West Pelzer Town council from 1994-97.

Other civic activities included her membership in the Pelzer Chapter of the Order of The Eastern Star, her membership in the Hejaz Country Girls, two years spent helping to implement the town’s comprehensive plan and zoning ordinance and three years spent as the chairwoman of the town’s Planning Commission.

She is a member of Pelzer First Baptist Church. 

Lozano is a homemaker, but worked as photo lab manager at the CVS Pharmacy for three years. She has three children, three grandchildren and one great grandchild. She has been  married to Sonny Lozano for 16 years..

She has definite goals for the town, including annexation and the aggressive pursuit of new business in the town.

Improving the town’s water and sewer service as cost effectively as possible is also a priority she said.

She would also seek to implement a committee of business people who would have a representative selected to attend Town Council meetings and express the business community’s concerns.

Another idea would attempt to help the area’s seniors, perhaps through volunteers who would help them get around or run errands for those unable to do so themselves.

Marshall King has been a resident of West Pelzer for 54 years. King is running as a write-in candidate. He has been a member of West Pelzer Baptist Church for 36 years, a member of the Pelzer Masonic Lodge for 48 years, is a Pelzer High School graduate, a WWII Navy veteran, and has been a father and husband for 58 years. He also retired after 30 years with the Fort Hill Gas Authority.

His goals are to make government responsible to all the town’s citizens, to be an advisor to the town’s businessmen and help attract new businesses to the town. He wants to see the town’s water service improved, and says if the town can’t raise the $50,000 matching funds for the $500,000 federal grant that has been approved, he would favor borrowing the money.

Decreasing the infiltration inflow into the town’s outdated sewer system is also important, says King.

King said he will be honest and fair with everybody.

District One School Board adopts 5 year strategic plan

Anderson School District One Board of Trustees approved a five year strategic plan, heard a presentation on a sidewalk project and approved personnel recommendations at their regular monthly meeting Tuesday.

After introduction of new teachers, board members recognized Palmetto Competitive Cheer Coach Sheri Alexander who was recently named the State High School Cheerleading Coach of the Year.

Alexander said she was one of three coaches selected from 90 coaches across the state in the High School Coaches Association. The top three were from Dorman, Summerville and Palmetto High, she said.

In addition to her many accomplishments in cheerleading including stints at Wren and Palmetto, Alexander’s Palmetto squad was the State AA runnerup for 2004/2005.

Anderson County Transportation Director Holt Hopkins and Principal Engineer Judy Shelato presented information on a proposed sidewalk project in the Wren High School area.

The $250,000 project will be funded $200,000 SCDOT enhancement grant and $50,000 in matching funds provided by Anderson County Council at the request of District 6 representative Bill Dees.

Hopkins told Board members the project will include a new 4,500 ft. sidewalk from Hwy. 81 to Wigington Road with a pedestrian crossing at Roper Road leading from  Wren Middle to the recreation fields at Hurricane Springs Park. A crossing will also be added from the Middle School to Wren High School and from the High School at Wigington Road. The sidewalk leading to the football stadium will also be replaced, Hopkins said. The project is expected to be completed in 2006.

They also presented other proposed future improvements they would like to see in the area including parking and landscaping at Wren Middle, relocating bus parking, remodeling the front of the school and parking to improve traffic flow, taking down the fence, adding sidewalks, and eliminating an entrance/exit at Wren High.

They also proposed a trail around the border of the district property to be used for Cross Country training.

“We want to work with the School District on projects up here,” Hopkins said. Hopkins also made a request for a letter of support for the project.

“We need to show support in our application.”

Acting on the recommendation of Superintendent Dr. Wayne Fowler, board members unanimously adopted the request by Hopkins.

“This will be a great addition for safety in the area,” Fowler said. “It will provide enhancements this school district couldn’t afford.”

County Council Representative Bill Dees and Representative Dan Cooper have been instrumental in the grant process, Hopkins said.

Director of Elementary Education Jane Harrison reported that the State Education Oversight Committee recognized eight District One schools for special efforts to close achievement gaps of students.

Recognized for their efforts are Cedar Grove Elementary, Hunt Meadows Elementary, Palmetto Elementary, Pelzer Elementary, West Pelzer Elementary, Powdersville Elementary, Wren Elementary, and Wren Middle.

School representatives will be recognized by the EOC in Columbia on June 13.

Harrison also reported that a recent meeting with District One Elementary principals showed they were excited about the accomplishments of this year and that a lot of curriculum work and assessment are underway for next year.

She reported that nine teachers will travel to Boston on a working trip to bring ideas back to the district.

She also reported that district personnel had finished a two day staff development work shop featuring speaker Marsha Tate who presented 20 Strategies for K-12.

Assistant Superintendent David Havird presented the District Nutritional report which showed $284,914 in revenues to $248,841 in expenses for a profit of $36,073 in April. Havird said the program is expected to show indirect costs of $95,000 to $100,000 and will probably show a $100,000 profit for the year.

He said the funds will be used for building and equipment improvements which would have come out of the general operating budget.

He also praised the nutritional staff for their support of students with snacks and other items during PACT testing.

Dr. John Pruitt presented the five year strategic plan which he said is geared toward having all students in the district testing proficient at a “B” or higher level.

“We want to continue to get better each and every year,” he said.

The plan includes academic goals in core subjects of English,Language Arts, Math, Science and Social Studies.

It also sets a goal of having SAT/ACT results for college bound students at or exceeding the national average.

The plan also focuses on attendance and discipline for students, high expectations for teachers and administrators and parents.

The plan sets direction for  the next five years with annual evaluations, Pruitt said.

The Board unanimously approved the strategic plan.

Board members also unanimously approved a request by Dr. Fowler to participate in the Statewide TAN program for the 2005/2006 year.

Fowler said the District did not have to use the Tax Anticipation Note program last year and that there is no cost to the district. The SCAGO TAN program allows the District to borrow money should a need arise.

“This year we did not have to participate,” he said.

“My goal and the District’s goal is not to participate in borrowing money. We will do everything possible not to have to participate,” Fowler said.

Following a brief executive session to discuss personnel, the board returned to regular session and approved personnel recommendations made by Dr. Fowler.

Unanimously approved were the following:

Leave of absence - Lynn King, Wren Middle English, April 29 through May 24; Donna Richey, Palmetto High Math, one year.

Resignations - Melissa Blair, Palmetto High Band; Marie (Lisa) Bower, Hunt Meadows Elementary Grade 1; Anne Galloway, Hunt Meadows Elementary EMD; Stella Grove, Palmetto High English; Teeka Holtzclaw, Palmetto Middle Social Studies; Beth McCall, Wren Middle Grade 6; Jeffrey Taylor, Wren High Science; Heather Tripp, Spearman Elementary, Grade 3; Roger Whitt, Palmetto Middle Band/Music; Leslie Wilson, Wren High Spanish.

Retirement - Ann Osborne, Concrete Primary, Grade 2.

Transfers - Jennifer Anderson, from Hunt Meadows Elementary Grade 4 to Palmetto Middle Grade 6 Language Arts; Lynn Brown, Wren Middle LD Resource to Wren Middle Guidance; Sherry Cothran, Wren Elementary, Computer Lab to District Assistant Software Specialist; Mary Gilstrap, from Palmetto Elementary to Wren Elementary Grade 3; Myra Montogomery, from Palmetto Middle LD teacher assistant to Spearman Elementary Grade 4; Jan Whitson, from Wren Middle Guidance to Wren High Guidance.

Other recommendations include:

Tracy Ammons, West Pelzer Elementary Grade 3; Kimberly Bolton, Palmetto Elementary Grade 1; Leslie Caldwell, Palmetto Middle Grade 5 Language Arts; Casey Calhoun, Palmetto High Social Studies; Tonia Crawford, Wren Middle Grade 6 Math/Science; Kathy Elrod, Spearman Elementary, Grade 1; Paige Eubanks, Spearman Elementary Grade 5; Andy Hooker, Powdersville Middle, Grade 8 Science; Cassia Imholz, Palmetto High English; Bron Kelley, Wren Middle Grade 6 Social Studies; Kevin Lakin, Palmetto High Band, Miranda Leopard, Concrete Primary Grade 1; Melanie Longtin, Powdersville Middle, Grade 8 Math/Science; Barbara Masaki, Powdersville Elementary School, TMD .

Also Donna Moore, Wren Middle, LD Resource; Sylvia Rogers, Palmetto Elementary 4K; Jamie Roszel, Palmetto High English; Kathleen Smith, Hunt Meadows Elementary Grade 1; Joey Tollison, Wren High Social Studies.

Administrative recommendations - Benny Bridges, District Bus Supervisor; David Coyne, Wren High Assistant Principal; Chip Ferguson, Wren High Assistant Principal.

Summer school recommendations were also approved for Palmetto Elementary, Palmetto Middle, Powdersville Middle, Wren Middle and Wren High.

Palmetto Elementary teachers include Lana Pack, Grade 1; Haley Dunn, Grade 2; Jill Hendricks, Grade 3; Jill Rogers, Grade 4; Elaine McGee, Grade 5; Candy Sell, Grade 5.

Palmetto Middle - Vicki Galloway, Grades 6-8 Reading, Language Arts; Johnny Neel, Social Studies; Kristen Terry, Science; Ken Goforth, Math; Ashley Dilworth, Math.

Powdersville Middle - David Bridges, Math; Cecilia Hamilton, Language Arts, Margaret Robinson, Language Arts; Sheree Fant, Social St./Science; Anita Mills Social St./Science.

Wren Middle - Angela Phillips, English Language Arts; Deanna Morris English Language Arts; Wanda Tharpe, Math.

Wren High - Karen Key - English I; Ryan Panter, Math Tech 1; Seth Young Math Tech II; April Haynes, Math Tech III.

Following the regular meeting. board members held a budget work session in anticipation of presenting the proposed $43,792,662 budget to the County Board of Education on June 14.  If approved by the County Board, a public hearing will be held before taking a final vote at the June 28 meeting.

District One Budget proposes 3 mill increase

Anderson School District One Board of Trustees held a budget work session in anticipation of presenting the proposed $43,792,662 budget to the County Board of Education on June 14.

The budget proposal contains several increases over last year’s budget, with the bulk in upkeep and maintenance, funding for after school programs, adding 15 new teachers and salary increases, according to Superintendent Dr. Wayne Fowler.

The budget shows a $398,939 shortage which will be made up with a 3 mill tax increase if it is approved.

Dr. Fowler said the District One budget is based on funding approved by the State Senate Conference Committee.

Proposed increases include $1,997,166 for salaries. This includes a 1.55 percent salary increase and a .5 percent increase in local supplement for teachers, increasing teacher pay to 12 percent above the state minimum.

The budget also includes a substitute teacher pay increase of $5 per day, amounting to $25,544.

Budgeted is an additional $587,678 for adding 15. 3 teachers as the result of student growth expected to be approximately 150 students.

Other increases include an expected health insurance increase of five percent in January budgeted at $176,772; national board certification $10,000 and increasing homebound funding by $10,000.

Student supplies and materials are being increased by $2 per student amounting to $16,800 which Dr. Fowler said gets the district back where it should be after cuts that were made over several prior years.

Fowler told the Board the budget includes $75,000 to continue after school programs which were being funded through a $4.5 million grant.

“We had the Cadillac version,” Dr. Fowler said. By combining summer school funding from the state and a carryover amount, Fowler said the district will be able to continue to provide homework centers 3 or 4 days each week staffed with certified teachers.

The budget includes additional funding of $80,000 for the Career and Technology Center. Dr. Fowler said the amount is based on a formula for District One and Two. He also said the CTC lost $60,000 in EIA money and will be getting approximately $20,000 from the District as a result of changes in the state funding.

Also included in the budget is $119,642 for six additional support personnel for schools.

Dr. Fowler also asked the board to approve $150,000 in the new budget for maintenance and special projects.

“We will have some needs that will come up,” he said. “We hope to have some money there, because we will need it.” If not he said, “It will have to come out of the operating fund budget,” if a need arises.

Other budgeted expenses include repairs and maintenance $13,538; property casualty insurance, $14,680; utilities $47,320; and technology hardware and software $23,000.

Revenues for the 2005/2006 budget are based on 8,099.58 students in grades K5-12. The district weighted per student amount is funded at $10,120.71.

Education Finance Act revenues are expected to be $17,879,569.

Dr. Fowler said the revenues generated from an expected 100 to 150 student increase has not been added in the budget figures.

He also said the state based student cost is now set at $2,290, but he expects it to be lowered to $2,200 per student.

State property tax relief is estimated at $1,717,730 and Homestead exemption of $586,767.

Anticipated local revenues are budgeted at $15,024; State EFA $26,906,739 and other sources $1,462,168.

Anticipated revenues are $43,393,713. Budgeted expenditures of $43,792,662 leave a difference of $398,949 which Fowler said will be made up by a proposed 3 mill increase for the District.

Dr. Fowler said District One has the lowest millage rate of Anderson’s five school districts.

The Distict One millage rated is 105.7, he said. Others are 153.8; 121.3; 132; and 140.5 respectively.

Dr. Fowler said he hopes the County Board of Education will approve the proposed budget which will allow the District to increase the fund balance to 5 to 7 percent in the future.

“There is a lot of money that we don’t spend in this district that the other Districts do spend,” he said. “Hopefully they will let us build our fund balance to that 7 percent.”

According to Fowler the value of a mill is set at $130,299.

On a $100,000 house, the 3 mill increase will amount to $12, he said.

The proposed $43,792,662 budget will be presented to the County Board of Education on June 14.  If approved by the County Board, a public hearing will be scheduled before taking a final vote at the June 28 meeting.

Downtown project plan to go before Council Monday

A downtown revitalization plan being proposed by the Town of Williamston and The Greater Williamston Business Association will be presented to Town Council Monday for approval before being submitted along with a grant application for funding for the project.

The plan received conceptual approval from engineers with the South Carolina Department of Transportation recently but still must be submitted along with the application for the SCDOT traffic enhancement grant.

The project has recently encountered opposition from East Main Street business owners and church members who do not want the parking spaces in front of their businesses and Grace United Methodist Church removed.

The preliminary plan which was approved by members of the Greater Williamston Business Association April 19, eliminated parking spaces on both sides of East Main St.

A group of approximately 20 members of Grace Methodist showed up for a meeting to offer their dissatisfaction for eliminating the parking spaces. They cited the need for handicapped parking for their elderly members and parking for the church mission store which is located on East Main.

They also stated that by eliminating parking on East Main, more people will be forced to cross Main St., creating a more dangerous situation because they will have to cross three lanes of traffic.

Several business owners including Dan Belk and Ken Major stated that the plan will hurt their businesses.

Mayor Phillip Clardy said the comments will be taken into consideration, however he stated that SCDOT may have the final say.

He raised the liability issue as a reason SCDOT would like to see the parking eliminated.

The proposed plan adds a turning lane into Town Square Center, eliminates parking along Main St., while adding a redesigned parking area in the area between McDonald’s and the musuem.

It also changes traffic flow in the  Town Square Center parking lot. The plan calls for one entrance at the present site and relocating the exit, which includes left and right turning lanes exiting the center closer to McDonalds.

A cross walk which has been the center of safety discussions in the past will be replaced with a new cross walk with brick banding and concrete or an asphalt pattern. Similar crosswalks will also be added near McDonalds and at the traffic light at Mill Street.

The plan calls for a low planted median to be placed between the traffic lanes allowing pedestrians a safety zone while crossing three lanes of traffic.

The original idea for a clock tower will be changed to a fountain because of grant restrictions. There will also be additional landscaping and trees in the plan, officials said.

The proposal is a conceptual plan and will change before the project is finalized, according to LandArt Design Group, Inc. architect Tipton Pitts.

A committee assigned by the Greater Williamston Business Association to look at options for a downtown redevelopment plan, has been working with Pitts for about a year to come up with a working plan to be submitted along with the grant application in June.

Committee members initially came up with 4 or 5 alternate plans, primarily focusing on rearranging parking or eliminating parking along East Main St., providing special lighting and placing a small amphitheatre/park with a clock tower as the centerpiece of the project.

SCDOT District Traffic Engineer Eric C. Dillon stated in a letter to Pitts that SCDOT conceptually agrees with the proposal to enhance SC Hwy. 20. It also states that they expect issues of parking, roadway alignment, and pedestrian safety to be addressed.

If a grant is approved, details of the plan will be finalized with input from the committee and business owners along East Main St.

According to the plan, the fountain will be located on the corner of the museum property at the entrance to Town Square Shopping Center.

GWBA members have been dicussing a downtown plan for several years and are hoping that the present plan, if approved for a grant, will be the beginning of an effort to make Williamston more attractive.

Approximately one year ago committee members decided to concentrate efforts on the core of the downtown area, from the Mill St. at Main St. traffic light, through downtown to the bridge over Big Creek.

The plan was revised to focus on East Main St. and will then be extended into other areas of the town in phases, officials said.

The GWBA has had several downtown redevelopment experts look at the town and present ideas for the group during the last five years.

Traffic calming devices such as pavers and bumpouts may be incorporated into the downtown plan as well as adding decorative trees and lighting, according to drawings being submitted.

Williamston Town Council passed a resolution indicating their support for a downtown revitalization project last July.

Town officials have met several times with SCDOT officials to look at options to improve safety in the area along East Main St.

As a result of those discussions, Department of Transportation officials have installed new pedestrian crossing signage at the East Main crossing and installed new signs warning approaching motorists of pedestrians before they reach the congested area.

Committee members said the plan takes safety along Main Street into account while adding to the attractiveness of the downtown area.

Trench Collapse

South Greenville firefighters along with other emergency personnel prepare a trench for safe entry Friday afternoon. Lester Millwood, 24, of Startex died when the trench he was working in collapsed trapping him under 4 feet of dirt. An autopsy showed the man died from asphyxia. Millwood’s uncle, Roy Millwood, who was also in the trench when it collapsed, was able to get out and was taken to Greenville Memorial Hospital, where he was treated and released, officials said.  The accident occurred in Crescent Creek subdivision located near Standing Springs Road and Ashmore Bridge Road near the Donaldson Center. (Photo by Tracy Eller)

Remembering Leslie Mazzara

Several area beauty queens were at the Calvary Home for Children tent at Freedom Weekend Aloft to promote the efforts of the organization which takes in abused and neglected youngsters. They were also keeping the memory of Leslie Ann Mazzara alive. Mazzara, a former Miss Williamston who participated in Miss South Carolina Scholarship Pageant, adopted Calvary Home for Children as one of her causes. She was killed seven months ago in Napa California. A film crew from 48 Hours was also at FWA to film for “48 Hours: Mystery,” a documentary about Mazzara’s death. The murder remains under investigation, Napa police officials said.

 

Teachers receive TIAA-CREF Awards

Greenville County Schools and TIAA CREF recently announced the third annual TIAA-CREF Leaders in Learning and Liberty Awards.  The program was established to provide recognition of the vital link between strong public schools and democracy.

There were six categories: Principal of the Year; Administrative Assistant of the Year; District Professional Staff Member of the Year; School Support Staff Member of the Year; Other Support Staff Member of the Year; and Operations Staff Member of the Year.

David Johnstone of Fork Shoals School  was named Principal of the Year. Johnstone is known for “thinking outside the box” and encouraging the staff to take risks. Through his leadership, the school has successfully met AYP and is attracting many new families to the school.

The staff has given him a 100% satisfaction rate in providing effective leadership. He has not only raised the quality of teaching and learning in his school, but has led the school to becoming an authorized International Baccalaureate School. As a result, students are becoming more open-minded, modeling and using the IB principles and attitudes every day.

Also recognized were Administrative Assistant of the Year, Linda Thigpen, Washington Center; Professional Staff Employee of the Year, Jane Kinard, Superintendent’s Executive Assistant and Board Liaison Julie Miller, Special Education Paraprofessional, Duncan Chapel Elementary was named school support staff of the year.

Suzanne Gervais, Processing Center Coordinator and Operations Staff Employee of the Year, Leon Dawkins, Building Superintendents, Simpsonville Elementary.

Greenville Schools earn Red Carpet Status

Three Greenville County schools recently earned the status as “Red Carpet Schools,” and a fourth school received the honor for the second time. The Red Carpet School award is presented by the State Department of Education to recognize schools with outstanding family-friendly environments. Winning schools receive red carpets with the state seal to display in their lobbies.

2005 recipients of the Red Carpet School designation are Bell’s Crossing Elementary, East North Street Academy, and Mauldin Middle. Crestview Elementary earned the award for the second time. The school system boasts 33 schools that have received the award over the past four years.

“It is exciting to see our number of Red Carpet Schools increase each year,” said Superintendent Dr. Phinnize J. Fisher. “The efforts these schools have made are affirmations that Greenville County public schools are improving their approach to create warm and friendly environments for parents and visitors.”

Greenville County Schools has 30 schools that received the Red Carpet designation over the previous three years. The schools are Armstrong Elementary, Augusta Circle Elementary, Berea Middle, Brushy Creek Elementary, Bryson Elementary, Buena Vista  Elementary, Chandler Creek Elementary, Crestview Elementary, Duncan Chapel Elementary, Ellen Woodside Elementary, Fork Shoals School, Fountain Inn Elementary, Gateway Elementary, Heritage Elementary, J. L. Mann High Academy, Lake Forest Elementary, League Academy of Communication Arts, Mauldin Elementary, Mountain View Elementary, Oakview Elementary, Paris Elementary, Plain Elementary, Sans Souci Intermediate, Sara Collins Elementary, Stone Academy of Communication Arts, Sue Cleveland Elementary, Summit Drive Elementary, Taylors Elementary, Wade Hampton High, and Westcliffe Elementary.

These schools go ‘above and beyond’ when it comes to providing excellent customer service. They provide warm, inviting environments where people feel not only welcome, but also like important members of the family.

Fifty-four schools statewide are being recognized by the program this year. Schools maintain their recognition for three years.

To apply for the recognition, schools are required to explain their family-friendly philosophies and environments, including methods used to evaluate those efforts. They were also required to include copies of the school’s communications plan.

Schools were judged on a variety of factors, including the exterior and interior appearance of the campus, the manner in which persons were treated in person and over the telephone, and the information and programs available for families and visitors.

 

 

 

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